Nutridex has two different antioxidant databases for you to reference. 

The ORAC Antioxidant Database

Otherwise formerly known as: USDA Database for the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of Selected Foods, Release 2. This database consists of 326 different food sources.

This database release 2.0 was formerly published by the USDA in May 2010 but taken down in 2012 (reasons unknown). This data uses the ORAC assay. Measurement is taken in micromoles per 100g.

The database has measurements for both the hydrophilic (H-ORAC) assay measurement and the lipophilic (L-ORAC) measurement. Hydrophilic meaning: having a tendency to mix with, dissolve in, or be wetted by water. Lipophilic meaning: tending to combine with or dissolve in lipids or fats. 

In this database provided by Nutridex, you can search for any food or supplement. View the Top 50, Top 100 or by Category.

The ORAC database is the most well known antioxidant database since it was sponsored and published by the USDA.

You can access the ORAC Antioxidant Database here.

The FRAP Antioxidant Database

This is the online Antioxidant Database measured by FRAP. FRAP stands for Ferric-Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP) assay.
This database consists of over 3100 different food and supplement sources.

In this database provided by Nutridex, you can search for any food or supplement. View the Top 50, Top 100 or by Category.

This database is different in that it has some specific products that were measured and in some cases measurements were made of multiple types of the same substance. This gives a great overview of the antioxidant capacity for any substance.

Compare this database to the U.S. Government ORAC database using the ORAC assay consisting of only 326 food sources. This database uses a different assay for antioxidant capacity -the FRAP assay.

Measurement in the FRAP database is taken in millimoles per 100g, as opposed to the ORAC assay which measured in micromoles per 100g. (1000 micromoles = 1 millimole) For comparison to ORAC, Nutridex has computed a micromole measurement expressed as “ORAC Equivalent” by simply multiplying the micromole measurement x 1000. This was not part of the original publication.

You can access the FRAP Antioxidant Database here.